Monaco

What Rear End 1981 Monte Carlo

The 1981 Monte Carlo SS was a beautiful car and a popular one. However, it did have its share of problems. One of these was the rear end.

The rear end on the 1981 Monte Carlo SS was a 10 bolt GM rear end. This was not a very strong rear end, and it was prone to breaking. The gears in the rear end could also strip easily.

If you have a 1981 Monte Carlo SS, it is important to keep an eye on the rear end. Make sure the gears are in good condition, and be careful when driving, especially if you are going to be doing any speed driving.

How do you tell if you have a 7.5 or 8.5 rear end?

When it comes to rear ends, there are a few specifications you need to know to determine what size you have. The first two are the ring gear size and the axle shaft size. The ring gear size is the size of the gear in the center of the rear end, while the axle shaft size is the size of the shaft that the wheel is attached to.

The next two are the series and the gear ratio. The series is the number of gears in the rear end, while the gear ratio is the number of times the ring gear turns for every time the axle shaft turns. For example, a 4.11 gear ratio means the ring gear turns 4.11 times for every time the axle shaft turns.

To determine which size rear end you have, you need to know the size of the ring gear and the axle shaft. You can find this information on the vehicle’s vehicle identification number (VIN). The ring gear size is the first number in the sequence, and the axle shaft size is the second number.

For example, if the VIN says the ring gear size is 7.5 and the axle shaft size is 8.5, you have a 7.5 rear end. If the VIN says the ring gear size is 8.5 and the axle shaft size is 7.5, you have an 8.5 rear end.

How do I know what rear end GM I have?

How do I know what rear end GM I have?

This is an important question to ask if you are considering upgrading your rear end gears. The GM rear end can be identified by the casting number on the differential. The following is a list of the most common GM rear ends:

10 bolt

12 bolt

14 bolt

There are also a variety of gear ratios available for each of these rear ends. You can find the gear ratio for your rear end by looking at the axle code on the vehicle identification number (VIN). The axle code is the second letter of the VIN. The table below shows the gear ratios available for each rear end.

Rear End Gear Ratios

10 bolt 

2.73, 3.08, 3.23, 3.42, 3.73, 4.10, 4.56, 4.88, 5.13

12 bolt 

2.73, 3.08, 3.23, 3.42, 3.73, 4.10, 4.56, 4.88, 5.36, 6.08

14 bolt 

3.08, 3.23, 3.42, 3.73, 4.10, 4.56, 5.13, 5.38, 6.17

What rear end do I have in my Chevy truck?

When it comes to Chevy trucks, there are a few different rear ends you could have. In this article, we’ll go over the most common ones and what they mean for your truck.

The most common rear end in a Chevy truck is a 6.5-inch rear end. This is a standard rear end that’s been used in many different Chevy trucks over the years. It’s a reliable rear end that can handle a fair amount of weight, making it a good choice for most people.

If you have a heavy-duty truck, you may have a different rear end. A 9.5-inch rear end is common in heavy-duty trucks, as it can handle more weight. This rear end is also wider than the 6.5-inch rear end, so it can provide more stability when towing or hauling heavy loads.

If you have a Chevy truck with a diesel engine, you may have a different rear end than those with a gasoline engine. A diesel engine requires more power, so a different rear end is necessary to handle the extra torque. A Dana 60 rear end is common in diesel trucks, as it can handle the extra power.

No matter what rear end you have in your Chevy truck, it’s important to know how to take care of it. Be sure to keep your rear end well-lubricated and check the fluid level regularly. This will help keep your rear end running smoothly and prevent any costly repairs down the road.

What is the difference between a 10 bolt and 12-bolt rear end?

There are many differences between a 10 bolt and 12 bolt rear end, but the three most important ones are: strength, size, and weight.

A 10 bolt rear end is weaker than a 12 bolt rear end. It is smaller, and it weighs less. This means that it is not as strong, it is not as big, and it weighs less.

A 12 bolt rear end is stronger than a 10 bolt rear end. It is bigger, and it weighs more. This means that it is stronger, it is bigger, and it weighs more.

Overall, a 12 bolt rear end is a better choice than a 10 bolt rear end. It is stronger, it is bigger, and it weighs more.

What Fords have the 8.8 rear end?

The 8.8 rear end is found in a variety of Ford vehicles. It is a popular choice for those looking for a reliable rear end option. The 8.8 rear end is known for its strength and durability. It can handle a variety of tasks, making it a great option for those who need a reliable rear end. The 8.8 rear end is also known for its smooth operation. It can handle a variety of terrain and surfaces, making it a great option for those who need a reliable rear end.

How do you tell if I have a 8.2 or 8.5 rear end?

There are a few ways that you can determine the size of your rear end. One is to look at the vehicle’s identification number (VIN). The VIN will tell you the size of the rear end that is installed in the vehicle. Another way to determine the size of the rear end is to measure the distance between the rear axle and the center of the rear wheels. This measurement will tell you the size of the rear end.

How do I identify my GM rear differential?

There are a few ways to identify your GM rear differential. One way is to look at the identification stamp on the differential. This stamp will tell you the model of the differential and the date of manufacture. Another way to identify the differential is to measure the ring gear. The ring gear is the large gear in the center of the differential. The ring gear will have a diameter of 10.5 inches on GM rear differentials.